Wednesday, February 02, 2011

Lĭt / uh / ruh / sē Äw / fĭs

February: Black History Month

Black History Month has its roots in something called Negro History Week. In 1925, Dr. Carter G. Woodson, an African-American historian who founded the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History, proposed Negro History Week as a way to encourage people to learn more about black history. He selected a week in February that included the birthdays of both Abraham Lincoln and black abolitionist Frederick Douglass.

The first Negro History Week was celebrated in February 1926. "The response was overwhelming," says the Library of Congress. "Black history clubs sprang up; teachers demanded materials to instruct their pupils; and progressive whites, not simply white scholars and philanthropists, stepped forward to endorse the effort."

In the early 1970s, Negro History Week was rechristened Black History Week to reflect the changing language used to describe African-Americans. Then, in 1976, as America observed its bicentennial, Black History Week was expanded to the full month we celebrate today.
AOL News: February 1, 2011

Celebrate and join in the 22nd National African American Read-In
Feb 1 - 28


The Read-In is sponsored by the Black Caucus of NCTE and NCTE.
Schools, churches, libraries, bookstores, community and professional organizations, and interested citizens are urged to make literacy a significant part of Black History Month by hosting and coordinating Read-Ins in their communities. Hosting a Read-In can be as simple as bringing together friends to share a book, or as elaborate as arranging public readings. Click here for Recommended Booklist. READ MORE !

Legacy: Treasures of Black History - Edited by Thomas C. Battle and Donna M. Wells - National Geographic, 2006

No comments: