Friday, April 21, 2017

Books beloved by readers

Are you a person who enjoys reading about reading? Who loves it when a book has an author as its character, is set in a bookstore or a library, or involves you in some magical aspect of reading? If so, here is an eclectic annotated list for you. Some appear in the teen section, some in sci fi, some in general adult fiction, but all are great reads for readers:

Recently reviewed on this blog: The Bookshop on the Corner, by Jenny Colgan


The Telling, by Ursula K. LeGuin
The planet Aka used to be a backward, rural, but culturally rich world. But once it came into contact with the Hainish civilization, abrupt changes were made by its ruling faction to transform it into a technologically advanced model society. Sutty, an official observer from Earth, has been dispatched to see if the disconnect has been too great. She learns of a group of outcasts living in the back country who still believe in the old ways and practice a lost religion called the Telling, and seeks them out, at some personal risk to both herself and them, to discover what this society is missing. (Science fiction)

The Book Thief, by Markus Zusak
This is the story of foster child Liesel Meminger, who is living just outside of Munich during World War II. Liesel steals books (thus the name) and--once she learns to read--shares them with her stepfather and also with the Jewish man hiding in their basement. The novel is narrated by Death. The language, the imagery, the story, the unusual point of view are all stellar. I'm not sure why this was pigeon-holed as a teen book, because it's a universally appealing story. (YA section)






The Thirteenth Tale, by Diane Satterfield
Biographer Margaret Lea lives above her father’s antiquarian bookshop. One day she receives a letter from one of Britain's premier novelists. Vida Winter is gravely ill, and wants to tell her life story before it's too late, and she has selected Margaret to do so. Margaret is puzzled and intrigued (she has never met the author, nor has she read her novels), and agrees to meet with her. Winter finally shares the dark family secrets she has long kept hidden, and Margaret becomes immersed in her story, which is a true gothic tale complete with a madwoman hidden in the attic, illegitimate children, and some ghosts. (Adult fiction)



The Book of Lost Things, by John Connelly   
David's mother has died, and the 12-year-old has only the books on his shelf for company. But those books have begun to whisper to him, leading him through a magical gateway to a series of familiar, yet slightly skewed versions of classic fairy tales and aiding him to come to terms with his loss and his new life. (Adult fiction and YA section)









The Shadow of the Wind, by Carlos Ruiz Zafon
Daniel, an antiquarian book dealer's son in post-Spanish Civil War Barcelona, falls in love with a book, only to discover that someone is systematically destroying all other works by this author. A combination of detective story, fantasy, and gothic horror. (Adult fiction)







The Eyre Affair, by Jasper Fforde
In an alternate-history version of London in 1985, Special Operative Thursday Next is tasked by the Special Operations Network with preventing the kidnapping of literary characters from books. When Jane Eyre disappears from the pages of the book by that name, Thursday is determined to prevent the trauma experienced by its fond readers. (If you like this one, there are many more in the series.) (Adult mystery)







Inkheart (plus sequels Inkspell, Inkdeath),
by Cornelia Funke
Meggie's father, who repairs and binds books for a living, has an unusual gift that became a curse in their lives: He can "read" characters out of books. But when he is reading a book to young Meggie, some characters escape into their world and her mother gets sucked into the story! Now it's time for Mo and Meggie to change the course of that story, send the book's evil ruler back into his book and maybe retrieve the person dear to them both.... (Children's room)

Not as directly reader-related, but with twisted versions of fairy tales interspersed throughout its exciting contents is Cornelia Funke's "Mirrorworld" series that starts with the book Reckless. Again, this series was billed and sold as a series for children and teens, but it's really a powerful and sophisticated fantasy about an alternate world that will appeal to all ages. There are three books, and more to come, according to Cornelia! (YA section)






People of the Book, by Geraldine Brooks
The historical saga of how a book--the Sarajevo Haggadah--came to be, and its storied history down through five centuries, written from the point of view of a curmudgeonly rare book conservator. Inspired by a true story, and beautifully written. (Adult fiction)


Mr. Penumbra's 24-hour Bookstore, by Robin Sloan  
Clay Jannon, a website designer who has lost his job as a result of the dot-com disaster, finds part-time employment on the night shift at Mr. Penumbra's Bookstore. But soon the strange goings-on at the store have Clay and his friends speculating about how the place stays in business; there are plenty of customers, but none of them ever seems to buy anything, and Clay is forbidden from opening any of the dusty manuscripts they periodically arrive to peruse. But when he gets bored and curious... (Adult fiction)

Ink and Bone, by Rachel Caine  
An alternate world, in which the Great Library at Alexandria never burned down. Centuries later, having achieved a status not unlike the Vatican in contemporary life, the Great Library and its rulers control the flow of knowledge to the masses. Paradoxically, although anyone can order up any of the greatest works of history from the library (via alchemy), personal ownership of books is forbidden. Jess Brightwell's family are black market book dealers, but Jess decides he wants to play it straight by entering the service of the Library. Or does he? My review is here. The sequel is Paper and Fire (review here), and the third book in the trilogy, Ash and Quill, is due out in July. (YA section)

The Storied Life of A. J. Fikry, by Gabrielle Zevin
Fikry, the owner of Island Books on Alice Island (think Martha's Vineyard) is in a bad way: His beloved wife has just died, sales are dismal, and someone has just stolen his rare edition of an Edgar Allen Poe poem. But then an unexpected discovery--an important "package" abandoned in his bookstore--changes his perspective on everything. (Adult fiction)






Denver homicide detective Cliff Janeway seeks a new career as a rare book dealer, but his stubborn need to solve an old murder keeps things lively. There are five books in the Cliff Janeway series by John Dunning; the first one is Booked to Die. (Adult mystery)  




There are probably dozens more books about books, reading, and writing; when I discover them, I'll share!



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